Xaquixe
       
     
xaquixe.png
       
     
 Xaquixe's main focus was making glass artifacts using multiple techniques such as blowing, casting, fusing, slumping and, sometimes, mixing them altogether. The  heart  of the studio was the furnace where glass was melted at 1300 Celsius. Here Pablo is filling it with 95% recycled glass and 5% of a special formula that allows typical beer bottles to look like prime crystal. 
       
     
 Pouring glass to make  sandcasting  prototypes. 
       
     
 Reheating a glass piece during the workshop offered every year at Xaquixe`s studio. 
       
     
       
     
       
     
 80% of all combustion based energy used for these hand-blown pieces fabrication was sourced from waste cooking oil.
       
     
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  Photography: Andrea Gilli
       
     
  Alberto Valenzuela's  alternative-fibers-packaging. 
       
     
       
     
Xaquixe
       
     
Xaquixe

Xaquixe, co-founded by Salime Harp and Christian Thornton, was my home from 2012 to 2016. More than a glass studio, we strove for it to be a political muscle capable of creating beautiful, sustainable and emotionally meaningful objects. Photography: Duncan Wolfe

xaquixe.png
       
     
 Xaquixe's main focus was making glass artifacts using multiple techniques such as blowing, casting, fusing, slumping and, sometimes, mixing them altogether. The  heart  of the studio was the furnace where glass was melted at 1300 Celsius. Here Pablo is filling it with 95% recycled glass and 5% of a special formula that allows typical beer bottles to look like prime crystal. 
       
     

Xaquixe's main focus was making glass artifacts using multiple techniques such as blowing, casting, fusing, slumping and, sometimes, mixing them altogether. The heart of the studio was the furnace where glass was melted at 1300 Celsius. Here Pablo is filling it with 95% recycled glass and 5% of a special formula that allows typical beer bottles to look like prime crystal. 

 Pouring glass to make  sandcasting  prototypes. 
       
     

Pouring glass to make sandcasting prototypes. 

 Reheating a glass piece during the workshop offered every year at Xaquixe`s studio. 
       
     

Reheating a glass piece during the workshop offered every year at Xaquixe`s studio. 

       
     

       
     

The most successful applied research program at Xaquixe allowed for 80% of all combustion energy, used for melting and reheating glass, to be based on waste cooking oil. By 2016 more than 35 restaurants in Oaxaca, Mexico, contributed with 600 liters of oil every week. 

COOKING OIL: From Waste to Energy - Directed by: Snejina Latev

 80% of all combustion based energy used for these hand-blown pieces fabrication was sourced from waste cooking oil.
       
     

80% of all combustion based energy used for these hand-blown pieces fabrication was sourced from waste cooking oil.

Screen Shot 2017-08-30 at 4.53.54 PM.png
       
     
tumblr_nan055Wazb1soexg2o1_1280.jpg
       
     
  Photography: Andrea Gilli
       
     

Photography: Andrea Gilli

  Alberto Valenzuela's  alternative-fibers-packaging. 
       
     

Alberto Valenzuela's alternative-fibers-packaging. 

       
     

CATAPULTA FEST  (Director's Cut)- Directed by: Laura Merians